Wednesday, April 7, 2010

The boy who lived before

Very intriguing story.
Watch these videos.

The boy who lived before
Delphiacademy

Clydebank Town, Scotland, whose chief industry until the 1970s was shipbuilding, suffered a brutal attack by the Luftwaffe during a two day onslaught in March 1941. By dawn after the all clear the people of Clydebank emerged from their shelters to find their houses and main buildings burning and beyond recognition.

The blitz, as was hoped, did not break the spirit of the people. Their following hardship strengthened the bond of the remaining population.

They helped to rebuild the devastation left behind by the ninety-six bomb craters.

Years later a new community sprang up and the memories of the dreadful war dissolved within the families of the older generation. Grandchildrens grandchildren lived a life of peace, and the Macaulay family were no different. Until that is, they became concerned by the behaviour of their six year old son, Cameron. It began as he developed his speech. He fantasized about having another family.

He said that he missed his mum - he remembered her with long brown hair down to her waist before she had it cut - and his brothers and sisters. He told stories of his life in Barra (160 miles away). His father he said was called Shane Robertson, and died because he never looked both ways.

He complained of only having one toilet in his new home; whilst his other house had three. He missed looking out his bedroom window watching aeroplanes land on the sand.

The more stories Cameron told to his mother and teacher the more distressed he became. He wanted to let his mother know that he was safe and well as she would be worried that he had gone missing. He wanted to go home.

His teacher, who was also concerned in his welfare, spoke to Camerons mother about a film company who were looking for people who believed they had been reincarnated. It was agreed that a crew party would take Cameron back to Barra together with child psychologist Dr Jim Tucker from Virginia, who specialised in reincarnation with children.

Cameron was overjoyed at returning to his home in Barra to once again be reunited with his family. They flew from Glasgow Airport to Cockleshell Bay and landed on the beach he has described on numerous occasions. Now do you believe me? he cried.

After booking into a hotel they contacted the Heritage Centre and asked if they had heard of a Robertson family who lived in a white house overlooking the bay. To their disappointment the centre had no documents on a white house. They then drove around the island but Cameron could not find his house.

Eventually they realised that Cameron had said that he had seen planes landing on the beach from his bedroom window they were going in the wrong direction. A phone call confirmed that there once was a Robertson family living in a white house on the bay. And keeping this a secret from Cameron they drove towards the house and he spotted it immediately.

As he ran through the door the colour drained from his face, this was not how he had remembered it. The rooms were the same, the three bathrooms were there, and so was the outside secret entrance. The main thing missing was his adored mother and family. Camerons heart sank in disbelief.

Researchers found the last remaining survivor of the Roberts family, but found nothing on record of his father Shane. Cameron looked at some old photos and did find the black dog and car he had always spoke about, but nothing more.

On his return from Barra life settled down for Cameron, he became calmer and accepted that his old life was in his past. He also now knows that when we die we do come back.

His mother asked him what was his name before, he says, Its Cameron. Its still me.








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